HOW AFRICAN INNOVATION CAN TAKE ON THE WORLD

In this period of gloomy economic forecasts, Africa’s rise has become a widely discussed international policy topic. The sweeping optimism about Africa’s economic prospects has been reinforced by 2013 projections that the continent will grow faster than the world average. READ MORE

CNN African Voices, August 2013

After decads of slow growth, Africa has a real chance to follow in the footsteps of Asia. Get up to speed on key indicators driving Africa’s growth.

What you need to know about tax consequences, investment incentives and other basic economic statistics from seventeen sub-Saharan countries.

Africa’s growth prospects differ not only country by country but also sector by sector. See insights to key sectors for investment.

Synopsis: Over the past decade six of the world's ten fastest-growing countries were African. In eight of the past ten years, Africa has grown faster than East Asia, including Japan. Even allowing for the knock-on effect of the northern hemisphere's slowdown, the IMF expects Africa to grow by 6% this year and nearly 6% in 2012, about the same as Asia. READ MORE

The Economist, September 2013

Synopsis: Celebrations are in order on the poorest continent. Never in the half-century since it won independence from the colonial powers has Africa been in such good shape. Its economy is flourishing. Most countries are at peace. Ever fewer children bear arms and record numbers go to school. Mobile phones are as ubiquitous as they are in India and, in the worst-affected countries, HIV infections have fallen by up to three-quarters READ MORE

The Economist, March 2 2013

Synopsis:Africa is the world’s second-fastest-growing region. Poverty is falling, and around 90 million of its households have joined the world’s consuming classes—an increase of 31 million in just over a decade. But a new McKinsey Global Institute report, Africa at work: Job creation and inclusive growth, shows that the continent must create wage-paying jobs more quickly to sustain these successes and ensure that growth benefits the majority of its people.READ MORE

McKinsey, August 2012

Synopsis: In 2013 Nigeria’s GDP could increase by 40%, which would be impressive even by Africa’s recent bouncy growth standards. The rise will come not from a surge in economic activity but because the country is rejigging the way it calculates its accounts. At the moment, Nigeria’s GDP estimate, like many statistics in Africa, is wildly inaccurate. But the new figures may owe as much to political calculation as to hard-nosed statisticians. READ MORE

The Economist, January 31 2013

Synopsis: This booklet contains a summary of tax and investment information pertaining to key countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The seventeen countries currently covered comprise Angola, Botswana, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Details of each country’s income tax, VAT (or sales tax) and other significant taxes are set out in the publication. In addition, investment incentives available, exchange control regimes applicable (if any) and certain other basic economic statistics are details. READ MORE

Tax Division of Deloitte, December 31 2011

Synopsis: The continent’s growth story isn’t entirely about the extractive industries. Although Africa’s growth prospects are bright, they differ not only country by country but also sector by sector. These articles examine the possibilities for seven of them: agriculture, banking, consumer goods, infrastructure, mining, oil and gas, and telecommunications. Perhaps the most fundamental point is that Africa’s growth story is hardly limited to the extractive industries. As many as 200 million Africans will enter the consumer goods market by 2015. Banking and telecommunications are growing rapidly too, and infrastructure expenditures... READ MORE

McKinsey, June 2010

Synopsis: Inadequate infrastructure remains a major obstacle towards Africa achieving its full economic growth potential. With Africa seen as one of the world’s fastest growing economic hubs, meeting the demand for key infrastructure has been identified as a priority. This translates into exciting opportunities for global investors who need to look past the traditional Western view of Africa as a homogeneous block, and undertake the detailed research required to understand the nuances and unique opportunities of each region and each individual country. This detailed piece of thought leadership looks at the importance of... READ MORE

Deloitte, 2013

Synopsis: Population and economic growth of many African economies have helped triple the size of the African middle class over the past 3 decades. The rise of the middle class has made the case for investment even more compelling; it is predicted that by the year 2060, the African middle class will make up for 42% of the total population. This growth translates to increased consumer spending and spillover effects not only for consumer goods and services but also in areas such as infrastructure development. However, companies and investors should not neglect the populations at the bottom of the economic pyramid if they wish to expand... READ MORE

Deloitte, 2013

Synopsis:Africa is at a critical juncture in its development trajectory. The global economic and geopolitical changes of the last two decades have shifted the global traditional power structures and witnessed the emergence of new powers from the South. This shift, driven largely by a revolution in information and communications technology, has led to substantial increases in cross-border capital flows and trade in intermediate goods, thus reflecting the rising importance of value chains. Changes in demography, rapid urbanization and a prolonged commodity-price boom have also made huge global changes,.. READ MORE

Economic Commission for Africa, 2013

Synopsis: n this period of gloomy economic forecasts, Africa's rise has become a widely discussed international policy topic. The sweeping optimism about Africa's economic prospects has been reinforced by 2013 projections that the continent will grow faster than the world average.. READ MORE

CNN African Voices,August 2013

Synopsis: Over the past decade six of the world's ten fastest-growing countries were African. In eight of the past ten years, Africa has grown faster than East Asia, including Japan. Even allowing for the knock-on effect of the northern hemisphere's slowdown, the IMF expects Africa to grow by 6% this year and nearly 6% in 2012, about the same as Asia. READ MORE

The Economist, December 3 2011

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